How we corrected nutrient toxicity in under a week

What is plant nutrient toxicity?

When one nutrient is present in large excess, it conflicts with absorption process of other essential nutrients. Thus, plants cannot access that essential nutrient or a group of essential nutrients because the excess nutrient or the toxic substance blocks the roots.

Symptoms caused by nutrient deficiencies are generally grouped into five categories:
  • 1) stunted growth
  • 2) chlorosis
  • 3) interveinal chlorosis,
  • 4) purplish-red coloring
  • 5) necrosis

Stunting is a common symptom for many deficient nutrients due to their varied roles in the plant.

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How we corrected nutrient toxicity in under a week


What is plant nutrient toxicity?

When one nutrient is present in large excess, it conflicts with absorption process of other essential nutrients. Thus, plants cannot access that essential nutrient or a group of essential nutrients because the excess nutrient or the toxic substance blocks the roots.

Symptoms caused by nutrient deficiencies are generally grouped into five categories:
  • 1) stunted growth
  • 2) chlorosis
  • 3) interveinal chlorosis,
  • 4) purplish-red coloring
  • 5) necrosis

Stunting is a common symptom for many deficient nutrients due to their varied roles in the plant.

Identifying nutrient burns or nitrogen toxicity

A common mistake new growers make is overfeeding their plants. Preventing nutrient deficiencies without producing a nutrient burn from overfeeding will take practice and careful monitoring.

While a nutrient and pH doser can help with precise administration of nutrients, many growers still feed by hand. We were able to quickly fix our nitrogen toxicity due to quick identification, noticing tell-tale signs such as:

  • Dark, shiny leaves
  • The “claw”, or curling up of leaves into a talon shape
  • Weak stems, stunted growth
  • Yellowing of leaves if not treated quickly

We began noticing our fan leaves were curling up, and turning darker and shiny. We also saw signs of a nutrient lockout, which is a condition where plants are unable to absorb nutrients in the root zone. Improper nutrient dosing (such as too much nitrogen) can cause this, and will lead to plants being deprived of other essential nutrients. This can cause deficiencies on top of the toxicity we were already experiencing. Luckily, we noticed this early and were able to take immediate steps to rectify the problem.

How to fix nitrogen toxicity or other nutrient burns

Addressing the affected plants quickly is important, and we began flushing the medium the next day. Flushing is the practice of feeding the plants pure water, and essentially removing all excess nutrients in the growing medium. This allows the plants to recover from the toxicity, and use up the remaining nutrients in the system. Most growers prefer using a flushing agent, which is a specially formulated mix of pure water and other chemicals which result in a more effective flush. We used pure water, after making sure the pH was neutral using a pH meter. After flushing for five days, we saw the plants return to a healthy state, and began feeding them the regular nutrient schedule again.

Prevention will always be the best medicine, and thus we encourage growers to always use a TDS, PPM, and EC meter to precisely mix their nutrient solution, ensuring optimal N/P/K levels. Carefully follow the dosing instructions of your fertilizer, and with careful monitoring you should be able to avoid this issue. If it does arise, be sure to quickly begin flushing the medium, and once the plants look healthy, begin reintroducing nutrients at ¾ strength at first.

 

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